About Us

1. Our mission

The Frederick County Forestry Board promotes conservation, stewardship, and sustainable use of our forest resources, urban landscapes, and other natural areas. We educate and inform the public and vigorously advocate for our local, regional, and national forest ecosystems. Forests and trees benefit people; provide homes for wildlife; enhance the quality of our streams, lakes, and the Chesapeake Bay. Trees are critically important as they cool the environment, retain and improve soil, produce oxygen while consuming carbon dioxide, and enhance our physical well-being and mental outlook. We believe trees and forests improve all facets of our lives.

2. Vision Statement

To lead the field of conservation and responsible stewardship, the Frederick County Forestry Board’s first priority is to retain or increase the integrity of our nation’s forest ecosystems, to protect existing forest resources from damaging agents that affect broad areas of forested land, to responsibly and effectively manage our publicly-owned forested lands, and to educate and inform the public.

3. Maryland Forest Conservancy District Boards

The Maryland Association of Forest Conservancy District Boards was created by a state act (Forest Conservancy District Act - Article Natural Resources, 5-601 to 5-610) of 1943. Maryland has 24 Boards, one for each county plus the city of Baltimore. A Maryland Forest Service Forester serves as the Executive Secretary of each Board. The Frederick County Forest Conservancy District Board is a state agency composed of volunteers appointed by the State Forester. The current Executive Secretary is Mike Kay, Maryland Forest Service Forester. Go to the Board members page to see a listing of the current membership.

The primary mission of the Frederick County Forest Conservancy Board is to promote the conservation, stewardship, and sustainable use of the forest resources of this county, both urban and rural, through advocacy and education of sound forest management principles. We accomplish this through our workshops, newsletters, partnerships (with the Maryland Forest Service, Monocacy Catoctin Watershed Alliance, and South Frederick Arboretum). The Frederick Board also conducts timber harvest reviews in conservation zones for the county (see our Timber harvest page). Along with the State Association, we recruit high school students interested in the field of forestry and natural resources for the week-long Natural Resources Careers Conference held the last full week in July in Garrett County at the Hickory Environmental Education Center (see our Education programs page.)

Basic information about the Frederick County Forest Conservancy District Board is available as a single page (duplex) FCFCDB tri-fold brochure (download PDF file which can be viewed and printed using Adobe Reader).

4. Statement of Purpose for Forestry District Boards

At the Maryland Forests Association 2005 Annual Meeting, Steven W. Koehn, Maryland State Forester, made a statement of purpose to all the forestry district boards in a presentation entitled "Our History, Our Roots . . . at the Turning Point?" His major points included:

  1. As leaders in the field of conservation and responsible stewardship, the first priority of each State Forester and of this organization must be to retain or increase the integrity of our nation’s forest ecosystems.
  2. Act to protect our nation’s existing forest resources from damaging agents that affect broad areas of forested land.
  3. Responsibly and effectively manage our publicly-owned forested lands.

Our history

We stand on the shoulders of those who came before us ...

The creation of the Board of Forestry was a result of the vision of Robert and John Garrett, who donated over 2,000 acres of mountain woodland in 1906 to the state, provided it would make proper provision for its care. The Board of Forestry objectives were to provide for the economic and scientific management of forests in the state through cooperative efforts with private forest landowners, and regulation of forest practices which allowed the adequate source of forest products. To learn more of the history of the Maryland Forest Conservancy District Boards, visit History of Maryland's Forestry Boards.